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Sustainability Weeks 2013 Events and Activities

Indigenous Heritage and Tourism: Succession and Creation of Living Heritage   

Overview

Date November 15-17, 2013  (Finished)  
Organizer Center for Ainu & Indigenous Studies, Hokkaido University
Co-host Center for Advanced Tourism Studies, Hokkaido University/ Biratori Town
Venue Day 1-2:HokkaidoConference Hall at Hokkaido University Day3: Historical Museum of Saru River at Biratori Town
  • Language:English / Japanese (simultaneous interpretation)
  • Intended Audience:Researchers, General public, College Students,
Outline
2013年11月15日 8:00 AMto2013年11月17日 8:00 AM

This symposium is intended to clarify the uniqueness of tangible and intangible indigenous cultural heritage and provide a platform for discussions with an international perspective on ways of passing this heritage on to future generations while ensuring its preservation and effective utilization. The keynote speakers will be Dr. Koichiro Matsuura (former Director-General of UNESCO and a contributor to the establishment of UNESCO’s List of Intangible Cultural Heritage) and Dr. George P. Nicholas, a professor at Simon Fraser University and the Project Director of IPinCH (Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage).

A Person in Charge Prof. Hirofumi Kato, Center for Ainu & Indigenous Studies, Hokkaido University
Registration Not required
Fees Free
Contact
2013年11月15日 8:00 AMto2013年11月17日 8:00 AM

Center for Ainu & Indigenous Studies
PIC: OKADA, Mayumi (Ms.)
E-mail: m-okada[at]let.hokudai.ac.jp *Please change [at] into @.

Report

2013年11月15日 8:00 AMto2013年11月17日 8:00 AM

 The International Symposium on Indigenous Heritage and Tourism: Succession and Creation of Living Heritage was held as a platform for discussions on the sustainable protection and utilization of indigenous cultural heritage.

 The three-day event took place at HU’s Conference Hall on November 15 and 16, 2013, and at the Historical Museum of the Saru River in Biratori Town on November 17.

 On November 15 and 16, Ainu individuals, local administrative officers, a representative of the business community, researchers working on the protection and utilization of indigenous cultural heritage, and members of the Intellectual Property Issues in Cultural Heritage (IPinCH) research project shared their insights on the questions Who Will Protect Indigenous Cultural Heritage? and How Will Indigenous Cultural Heritage Be Inherited? IPinCH is a Canada-based international project focusing on intellectual property right issues in cultural heritage.

 On the afternoon of November 16, former UNESCO Director-General Koichiro Matsuura delivered a keynote lecture on the significance and circumstances leading up to the establishment of the Convention for the Safeguarding of Intangible Cultural Heritage, to which he contributed significantly while in office. He also outlined challenges to be addressed by Japan and the international community as a whole in order to promote the protection and inheritance of indigenous cultural heritage.

 On November 17, working-level regional government officials involved in local tourism development made presentations on their initiatives in response to the topic question Can Tourism Development Leverage Local Cultural Resources?

 The symposium was attended by more than 300 people, including members of the general public, HU students/faculty members, and administrative officials. Attendees asked various questions and made comments from the perspectives of indigenous policy, archaeology and tourism on the presentations covering collaboration with indigenous people in cultural heritage protection and utilization in Japan and elsewhere. Observations were also made on initiatives taken by the international community and national/local governments to address these issues.

 The event provided valuable opportunities for the introduction of domestic and overseas examples of cultural heritage management toward collaboration with local residents or indigenous people – a topic about which relatively little is known in Japan.